Part 3: The 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study

FPGA Effort Verification Trends (Continued)

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In my previous blog (click here), I focused on the controversial topic of effort spent in FPGA verification. This blog continues that discussion. I stated in my previous blog that I don’t believe there is a simple answer to the question, “how much effort was spent on verification in your last FPGA project?” I believe that it is necessary to look at multiple data points to truly get a sense of the real effort involved in verification today. So, let’s look at a few additional findings from the study.

Time FPGA designers spend in verification

For projects that have a separation of teams (i.e., design engineers and verification engineers), it’s important to note that FPGA verification engineers are not the only project members involved in functional verification. FPGA design engineers spend a significant amount of their time in verification too, as shown in Figure 1.

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Figure 1. Average (mean) time FPGA design engineers spend in design vs. verification.

You might note (on average) that FPGA design engineers spend slightly more time doing verification than design, and this has not changed within the last few years.

Even if the FPGA project has a separation of teams, the designers are still involved in the verification process, ranging from:

  • Small sandbox testing to explore various aspects of the implementation
  • Full functional testing of IP blocks and SoC integration
  • Debugging verification problems identified by a separate verification team

In fact, getting a better understanding of exactly where FPGA designers spend their time has led us to conduct a series of follow-on discussions with various FPGA projects from various market segments. Through this process we have learned a concern by many project managers related to the increase amount of debugging time spent on a project (both pre-lab and lab debugging time). This is one area of FPGA verification that we plan to continue to explore through a series of in-depth discussions with multiple FPGA projects around the world.

Percentage of time FPGA verification engineers spends in various task

Next, let’s look at the mean time FPGA verification engineers spend in performing various tasks related to their specific project. You might note that verification engineers spend most of their time in debugging. Ideally, if all the tasks were optimized, then you would expect this. Yet, unfortunately, the time spent in debugging can vary significantly from project-to-project, which presents scheduling challenges for managers during a project’s verification planning process.

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Figure 2. Average (mean) time verification engineers spend in various task

In our 2012 study we found that FPGA verification engineers spent about 37% of their time involved in debugging task. There was a 16 percent increase in the amount of time spent in debugging between 2012 and 2014. However, the 2016 study did not find a significant change in any of the categories where FPGA engineers spend their time.

In my next blog (click here) I present our study findings in terms of FPGA schedules, iterations in the lab, and classification of functional bugs.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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