On-demand Webinar: Optimizing Electronics Cooling Efficiency with 3D Printing

HP and Siemens partnered on a project to make the cooling ducts in HP printers more efficient. With a combination of simulation, design and 3D printing, the team achieved air flow efficiency improvements of 23%. This webinar, hosted by IEEE / Engineering 360, will discuss the process and tools used to achieve these improvements.

Register now for the on-demand webinar!

HP and Siemens partnered on a project to make the cooling ducts in HP printers more efficient. With a combination of simulation, design and 3D printing, the team achieved air flow efficiency improvements of 23%. This webinar will discuss the process and tools used to achieve these improvements.

As electronics become more complicated and space in electronic devices continues to be at a premium, being able to create cooling that is unconstrained by the geometry required for conventional manufacturing becomes a game changer. This is the promise of 3D printing, or additive manufacturing.

Key Takeaways

    • Gain insight into the robust software and hardware necessary to extract the full potential of 3D printing.
    • Understand why cooling of electronics is often not as efficient as it could be.
    • Learn how simulation, design and 3D printing are the basis for unlocking the potential of efficient electronics cooling.

Speakers

Ashley Eckhoff, Additive Manufacturing Expert, Siemens PLM
Ashley Eckhoff holds two engineering degrees from the University of Missouri and has worked for Siemens for over 20 years. He has spent the past five years focusing on additive manufacturing, helping to drive the design and use of additive manufacturing software tools within the Siemens suite of software products. He often represents Siemens at various additive manufacturing events like Formnext, the AMUG and Rapid.

Fram Akiki, Vice President, Electronics & Semiconductor Industry, Siemens Digital Industries Software
Fram has over 30 years of experience in the electronics and semiconductor industry. Prior to joining Siemens, Fram was an executive for 12 years with Qualcomm in their chipset division and spent 21 years with IBM in their microelectronics group. Fram holds a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Clarkson University, and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and a M.B.A. in International Business from The University of Vermont. He has authored a number of white papers, holds a patent on RFID/cellular connectivity for the IoT market and is an adjunct instructor at Clarkson University.

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